Black History Month Assembly

Students of Morton West gathered on February 14th to celebrate black history through song, dance, and poetry

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Black History Month Assembly

Dahlia Wilkes

Dahlia Wilkes

Photo by Alex Butterfield

Dahlia Wilkes

Photo by Alex Butterfield

Photo by Alex Butterfield

Dahlia Wilkes

Jailene Torres

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Emcee Mia Coronado began the assembly with a the Pledge of Allegiance and introduced the acts by saying, “Today we are not only gathered here to celebrate the history of Black people alike, but to also understand the importance of Black History Month for every person of all races and ethnicities.”  Coronado continued by stating, “Beginning in 1926, Carter G. Woodson decided to make the second week of February “Negro History Week,” as the second week included Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass’ birthdays. The week was used to educate young students in public schools about the history of African American peoples and Black history in America.”

Photo by J. Alfaro
Anyce Paul-Emile and Kayla Sweatt

Anyce Paul-Emile and Kayla Sweatt were first on-deck and recited the poem “Growing Up Mixed” which highlighted the struggles mixed-ethnicity students encounter.  Some of the more memorable lines: “It’s okay though because I love myself.  I may not speak Spanish.  I may not have a white complexion.  I don’t know all the popular dances.  I may not speak my mind all the time.  But that doesn’t mean I’m not black and (Hispanic/Caucasian).”

Emcee Sharion Brady then introduced Kelleyah Giles who recited Maya Angelou’s famous poem “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.”  Emcee Maggie Medina led attendees into the next act, noting, “Black History month is a month where one creates a bond of love, walking as brothers and sisters.”  Dahlia Wilkes then sang her rendition of the song “Powerful” by Jussie Smollett and Alicia Keys.

Photo by J. Alfaro
Sunshine Rodchester

Other acts included “On Tonight’s New,” a poem recited by Mia Coronado;  Sunshine Rodchester dancing enthusiastically to “Beat It”;  Camille Brandon sharing her poem “Untitled” with one of the stanzas really impacting the audience:  “You buried me and I helped/ Hypocrisy on both sides of the fence/ But I’ve changed my mind/ I am not what Media decides to call me/ People who are infected with Racism cannot define me, either”; Briana Williams, Kaniaya Patton, Sareenah Mason and Lynae Davis together sang “Lift Every

Photo by A. Butterfield
Camille Brandon

Voice.”;  Kaya Green read the poem “Hey, Black Child”;  and Dance Group Ensemble Anyce Paul-Emile, Justin Ramirez, Amalee Houston, Anthony Barragan and Daniel Bonion energetically moved to a  mash-up of songs by black artists.

Marina Zurita closed the festivities by emphasizing, “We hoped that you enjoyed joining us in celebrating Black History Month. On behalf of the students and staff that planned today’s assembly, thank you for being a wonderful audience.”  Indeed, all of the audience was captivated and appreciated the artistic talents of their peers’ performances.

Photo by A. Butterfield
Dance Ensemble

Photo by A. Butterfield
Assembly Participants

 

 

 

 

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